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Dennis R.

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  1. 40 votes
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    0 comments  ·  OneDrive Archive » OneDrive for Business  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →
    Dennis R. shared this idea  · 
  2. 11 votes
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    2 comments  ·  OneDrive on the web  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →
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    Dennis R. commented  · 

    OK..Above is really a hardened solution I'd see first available for business/enterprise entities. Dialing back to earth: to protect yourself from ransomware, just make a designated dupe/backup folder in your onedrive and periodically copy your onedrive contents then deltas to it. The idea being: "never" sync that folder to a local device. I think for practical purposes. you'd sync that folder to your device when its known to be clean and not under attack just to back your stuff up due to the fact that wwwDavRoot/SMB file transfers are approaching unusability. Then unsync and delete it off your local system. Score one for selective sync! Ransomeware encryption attacks would only be effective on your latest files from the last backup. Now if MS could just automate that process: you make/copy a new file or edit it, when it syncs up to the cloud its auto copied to that folder. (to avoid syncing your backup folder just to take a backup and then delete it from local storage part of the process) And yes...if your attacked by ransomware all of your onedrive less that folder would copy to it as well...but those can be deleted easily. And yes you'd still consume twice your storage, but its the price of piece of mind!

    Dennis R. shared this idea  · 

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